INJURIES

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Each step we take while walking places 1-1.5 times of our body weight onto our feet, while running subjects our feet to 4-6 time our body weight. Even slight anatomical aberrations such as high or low arches, increased or decreased mobility in the foot joints or insufficient activity in the muscles in the lower legs, may cause major problems for anyone who walks, jogs or runs regularly, as such aberrations can change the alignment and strain of almost all joints. Overpronation, resulting from there being too much mobility in the subtalar joint, is typical and can be a leading cause of problems. Such excess mobility in the midtarsal joint can also affect the foot, especially in the final position before completing the step (forefoot pronation).

Some of the more common problems include the following

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Pronation

Pronation is a normal movement of the foot; it allows the foot to function in different environments and on uneven ground surfaces. The foot moves outwards and inwards, depending on the surface. The pronation also serves as a form of “shock absorber”. The foot moves as the inner arch sinks downward. Overpronation occurs when such movements are too great. It is very common and affects almost all joints in the body.

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Heel spur (plantar fasciitis)

Plantar fasciitis (inflammation in the plantar facial). The Cavus foot has a higher frequency of plantar fasciitis. Typical symptoms include tenderness and pain in the morning, centred along the inner edge of the heel bone. An individually shaped, stabilising insert providing support under the entire foot is often a good solution.

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Shin splints

Inflammation of the periosteum in the inner edge of the tibia. The Tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior are overextended.

Advancing in your physical training too quickly may be a cause; however, another and more common cause is overpronation. A change in the surface on which you are training may be another contributing factor. As well, there could possibly be a combination of one or more of the aforementioned causes.

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Hallux valgus

Hallux valgus is most often related to overpronation, and to the common reason of shoes being too narrow. It is more common among women, since women have greater mobility in all their joints. The big toe is important for stabilising the foot, while walking and a big HV means less stability. Frequent pain in the big toe’s main joint. Crooked big toe.

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Morton’s Syndrome

Trampled front arch. Often a cause of overpronation, where the big toe has pushed the other toes outwards in the pronation phase. This causes a pinching of the nerve. Pain experienced when weight is applied can be relieved with a pad and an insert supporting the arch.

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Back problems

Aberration in the foot can result in a misalignment of the pelvis, as it rotates forward.

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Achilles tendon

Common among growing children. With overpronation, the angle of the heel bone becomes larger, which modifies the the strain on the achilles tendon negatively.